The benefits of going to the pub

Dry January seems like a distant memory, and after weeks of lockdown, we no longer need our arms to be twisted to have an alcoholic drink. Before the pandemic, 25% of pub visits were alcohol-free, and another 45% opting for low-alcohol offerings.

people having a drink
Photo by Eugen Buzuk on Pexels.com

Get crafty

After years of persistence from brewers and fans alike, the phrase ‘craft beer’ has taken root. People are drinking more craft ales and beers. It is often said that there has never been a better time to be a beer drinker in the UK. In many ways, this statement is an accurate one. In essence, the number of breweries opening in the last ten years has skyrocketed. There is a greater availability and range of beer styles present in pubs and bars across the country than ever before.

red and white neon lights
Photo by Nextvoyage on Pexels.com

What will we be drinking in 2020?

Are you aware that your drink choices are ever-evolving and are directed by bars, pubs and restaurants keeping your finger on the pulse of the current drinks menu? Consumers continue to expect the brands they engage with to go the extra mile for them, meaning brands have to work harder to establish real connections with customers.

So, what should you watch out for in 2020?

assorted wine bottles
Photo by Chris F on Pexels.com

Are wet-led pubs back on the rise?

The British are known for many things, and pubs are certainly one of them.  Pubs used to be where you would stop on the way home from work to have ‘a quick one’ or a refreshment break or friendly catch-up on the weekend. I am not sure when the change took place, but for too long pubs have become food-led establishments. Have the tides turned, and are wet-led pubs back on the rise?

The Wharf
Left to right, Jason, Rhys and myself behind the bar at the now-demolished The Wharf, in Cardiff Bay